For Your Information III


For Your Information III


F:\FYI III ========== ** A Smile and a Shoeshine - Laurie Taylor explores the world of the travelling salesman, examining the allure of the character for so many writers, film-makers and dramatists. ** Astor Place Riots - The curse of Macbeth, one of the most ill starred plays in theatrical history, took its greatest toll in the Astor Place riots in New York, one of the bloodiest riots ever to take place in the history of the United States.On May 10,1849, US militia killed 23 people and wounded over 100. Was this just the unhappy climax of a longstanding feud between two actors? Not quite. Tim Pigott Smith traces the events on the streets of New York, looking at and beyond this pivotal moment, examining the tensions between nations and the antagonisms between classes in a city ripe for reform. ** Before Your Very Ears - Grant Gordon explores the rich history of magic on radio. ** Being Yourself - Fine Time Fontayne ** Bette in Britain - Susan George recalls the visits to Britain of Hollywood legend Bette Davis and reveals the impact she had on British actors, directors and producers. Reflecting the plotlines of characters she played on screen, Bette Davis's visits across the Atlantic left behind stories of success, mystery, court battles, failed marriages and sadness. She starred in several British films and was inspired by British history and culture. She came here in the seventies to tour her one-woman show, allegedly finding her relatives in Cardiff. The programme features Davis's memorable appearance at The National Film Theatre and archive interviews. Contributors include actor Wendy Craig, broadcaster Wyn Calvin and director Jimmy Sangster. ** Beware The Stare - According to Beware the Stare!, a programme on Midwitch author John Wyndham, the film adaptation was shot in England because the head of MGM was a Catholic "who took one look at the script and screamed `blasphemy'" and refused to have it shot on American soil. ** "We will be looking at what the Universe was made of billionths of a second after the Big Bang" Scientists have hailed a successful switch-on for an enormous experiment which will recreate the conditions a few moments after the Big Bang. They have now fired two beams of particles called protons around the 27km-long tunnel which houses the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The 5bn machine on the Swiss-French border is designed to smash protons together with cataclysmic force. Scientists hope it will shed light on fundamental questions in physics. *** The Edinburgh scientist who gave his name to the Higgs Boson particle said it was "pretty likely" it would be found by the Big Bang experiment. Professor Peter Higgs, 79, expressed confidence he would be proved right, 44 years after he proposed his theory. Scientists hope the Large Hadron Collider operated by Cern will uncover the sought after particle, which is sometimes called the God Particle. It is a theoretical explanation for the origin of mass in the Universe. It is also thought without the particle there would be no gravity. Big Bang Day - Engineering Solutions Big Bang Day - Five Particles 1.5- The Electron Big Bang Day - Five Particles 2.5- The Quark Big Bang Day - Five Particles 3.5- The Antiparticle Big Bang Day - Five Particles 4.5- The Neutrino Big Bang Day - Five Particles 5.5- The Next Particle Big Bang Day - Physics Rocks Big Bang Day - The Genuine Particle Big Bang Day - The Making Of CERN 1.2 Big Bang Day - The Making Of CERN 2.2 ** Brel et Moi - Alastair Campbell on Jacques Brel: Former Labour strategist Alastair Campbell reveals his passion for the music of the late Belgian singer/songwriter. At the peak of his career during the 50s and 60s, Brel's music explored emotions darker and deeper than the conventional popular songs of the time, and his live performances were famed for their intensity and ferocity. Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 01 - Aunt Mary's New Tooth Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 02 - Grog in 1740 Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 03 - Clam Chowder Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 04 - Bits of Bread (aka Napkins) Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 05 - Tom Mollino Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 06 - Parliament Buildings Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 07 - Tin Can Tied to Dog's Tail Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 08 - First Car of Funeral Train Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 09 - More Married Men Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 10 - A Girl Changes Her Mind Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 11 - 44 Year Old Quarrel Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 12 - Two Million an Hour Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 13 - Building Rises from the Sea Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 14 - Two Days on a Streetcar Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 15 - Ostracize Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 16 - Boy Battles Eagle Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 17 - Sneezing for 21 Days Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 18 - Stone Giant Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 19 - Number Two Is Unlucky Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 20 - Frightened out of Speech Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 21 - Chimp Language Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 22 - 1788 War Prediction Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 23 - Animal's Field Day Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 24 - Two Billion Dollar Bet Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 25 - Funeral Fire Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 26 - Explosion Heard Three Thousands Miles Away Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 27 - Five Men Swindled Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 28 - Not English Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 29 - Reward Nineteen Years Later Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 30 - Joan of Arc Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 31 - Marriage Customs Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 32 - Black Cats Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 33 - His Brother's Father Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 34 - Babies and Weather Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 35 - Detective Stories Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 36 - Ape Saved Key Posession Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 37 - Angel of Death Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 38 - Ocean Pictures Can You Imagine That - xxxxxx - 39 - Victim Arrested *** Casanova 1.5 Actor, Lover, Priest, Spy by Ian Kelly - Giacomo Casanova's parents send him away from Venice for his health. Casanova 2.5 - Casanova's scandalous affair with a married woman forces him to leave Rome. Casanova 3.5 - Casanova inveigles himself into the lavish court of Louis XV, where he causes a stir. Casanova 4.5 - Casanova arrives in London, where he falls for the city's most infamous courtesan. Casanova 5.5 - Casanova accepts an invitation to a masked ball at the Winter Palace in St Petersburg. *** Cosmic Quest Omnibus 1.6 by Heather Couper - Ancient Visions - Since the dawn of modern humans, people have been looking into the sky in wonder. Cosmic Quest Omnibus 2.6 - Wandering Planets and the Centre of the Universe - From the ancient Greeks to Nikolaus Copernicus and Johannes Kepler. Cosmic Quest Omnibus 3.6 - A Matter of Some Gravity - Galileo, Newton, Halley and the invention of the telescope, which opened up the skies. Cosmic Quest Omnibus 4.6 - The Galaxy and Beyond - As techniques improved, nebulae were revealed to be galaxies in their own right. Cosmic Quest Omnibus 5.6 - Chance and Purpose in a Violent Universe - Cosmic Quest Omnibus 6.6 - Birth, Life and Death - Heather Couper concludes the omnibus edition of her major narrative history of astronomy. *** Could I Stop Being a Muslim - Former Muslim radical Shiraz Maher spent his student days campaigning for an Islamic caliphate in which execution for renouncing Islam would be written into the constitution. Now Shiraz is calling for moderation and greater Muslim integration into British life, a stance which has meant he himself is now labelled an apostate by some Muslim radicals, for which the penalty is death. He asks whether such an extreme punishment is really justified by the Qu'ran and the example of the Prophet Muhammad. *** Deep in the Heart of Texas - Peter Curran explores the history of Austin, Texas. The city famously hosts the SXSW festival and remains liberal, progressive and bohemian, *** Disappearing Art of the Mix Tape - Broadcaster and journalist David Quantick celebrates the home-produced compilation cassette, a disappearing art form in an age when music can be readily downloaded. *** Dream Boats - This is the story of Liverpool's 'Cunard Yanks', the young men who worked for the Cunard line in the glory years of the transatlantic liners. They sailed to New York and came back dressed like film stars, laden with exotic consumer goods and music unknown in ration-book Britain. *** Ed Sullivan and the Gateway to America - Joan Rivers marks the 60th anniversary of the first-ever Ed Sullivan Show. Ed Sullivan began his career with a newspaper column and radio show. He moved on to hosting CBS' Toast of the Town in 1948, and made it so popular that it was re-named after him. The show introduced rock 'n' roll to the baby boomers, and became a vital gateway for British acts intent on breaking America. Elvis Presley's appearance in September 1956 became notorious for his performance of Hound Dog, but also commanded the largest single audience in television history at 60 million viewers. Likewise, the Beatles' debut in February 1964 effectively kick-started the British invasion and confirmed the group as a global phenomenon. *** Educating Mill - John Stuart Mill laid the foundations for modern ideas about freedom, but his own remarkable education by his father is a story of compulsion and manipulation that still resonates today. This is an exploration of Mill's history in his own words and those of Mill scholars from around the world. With Jamie Glover as JS Mill, John Dougall as James Mill and other readings by Ioan Meredith. *** Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind - Actor and writer John Sessions goes in search of his poetic hero Alexander Pope. Although his work fell out of fashion shortly after his death and has remained so ever since, John argues that behind the formality of Pope's heroic couplets beats a passionate and often angry heart. Modern poets and satirists including Peter Porter and Ian Hislop discuss how Pope continues to inspire and influence their work today. He is the third most frequently quoted writer in the English language, after Shakespeare and Tennyson. Pope was a master of the heroic couplet. *** Fifty Years Of The Royal Court - New plays by Sir Tom Stoppard and Sir David Hare, and the acting skills of Harold Pinter, are to form the highlights of the Royal Court Theatre's 50th anniversary year *** Freemasons - What's this all about, grown men dressing up and performing rituals, fancy handshakes included? (45 mins) *** I Didn't Get Where I Am Today 1.5 - David 'Reginald Perrin' Nobbs, BBC comedy writer, reads from his autobiography. I Didn't Get Where I Am Today 2.5 I Didn't Get Where I Am Today 3.5 I Didn't Get Where I Am Today 4.5 I Didn't Get Where I Am Today 5.5 *** Image Of A Troubled Mind - Brain scientist Mark Lythgoe now looks at where imaging is taking psychiatry. What can the technology of brain scanning tell us about mental illnesses such as clinical depression and schizophrenia? In the future, will brain imaging improve the outlook for individuals with these conditions? *** Investigation - Teenage Knife Crime - Simon Cox investigates teenage knife crime. Press coverage has mainly focused on the victims, but is there any common link between the perpetrators? *** Kaleidoscope Feature - Iain Sinclair - Interview with novelist & psychogeographer Iain Sinclair. Iain Sinclair sets his novels in the world of second hand book dealing. He says that this is because there are so many strange and eccentric people in the trade. Here he describes some of them, and his feelings about place. *** Last Word - Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have died recently: Geoffrey Perkins and Ken Campbell - *** Laurie's Loose Change - Forty years after the introduction of the hole-in-the-wall cash machine, Laurie Taylor wonders whether his loose change is safe. Some people see plastic as the future and cash as dirty and old-fashioned. Oyster cards have virtually removed cash from London's trains and buses, and contactless payment cards are hitting the streets and shops. Laurie meets those on both sides of the cash divide. *** Let Me Entertain You 1.4 - *** Longing For Silence - Kate Cook goes on a deeply emotional journey to explore what hope there is for a cure for the chronic tinnitus she has suffered for a quarter of a century. *** Lost Beatles Interview - Sixties star Helen Shapiro presents the story of a lost TV interview with the Beatles that was recorded in April 1964 and recently found languishing in a rusty film can in a garage in South London. Experts say it's the earliest surviving interview where Lennon and McCartney talk about how they met and discuss the song writing process. With contributions from the original TV interviewer Paul Young - who had never seen the footage, which was part of a regional television programme broadcast only in Scotland - Beatles expert and writer Mark Lewisohn and Dick Fiddy of the BFI. *** People of the British Museum 1.5 - Series exploring the British Museum through the eyes of the people that work there. People of the British Museum 2.5 - Storehouse of Knowledge - Irvine Finkle is one of 40 people in the world who understands ancient Babylon script. People of the British Museum 3.5 - Storehouse of Knowledge - David Thompson, curator of clocks and watches, reveals how he is fascinated by them. People of the British Museum 4.5 - Art of the Sword - Paul Martin reveals how he got his dream job looking after Japanese swords at the museum. People of the British Museum 5.5 - Treasure and Healing - Higlighting Swedish coins the size of a tea tray and Chinese bank notes, A4 size; plus 2 to 3 million art prints. *** Policing the Poppy Fields 1.2 - After last year's record opium crop in Afghanistan, counter narcotics is a top priority for Britain, and the Afghan Government. Over the last year, BBC correspondent Kate Clark has had rare access to the fight against a trade which fuels corruption and insecurity and bankrolls the Taleban. In this two-part series, she asks just how effective these efforts can be. Kate Clark was granted unique access to Sir Sherard Cowper-Coles, Britain's Ambassador to Afghanistan, and his team as they join forces with the Afghan Government to take on the country's drug barons. The Afghan government says that the growing of poppy plants is against the teachings of Islam. The number of addicts has quadrupled in two years and there are claims that many policemen are on drugs. Policing the Poppy Fields 2.2 - *** Secret Weapon of the Cold War - The Cold War wasn't just a battle for territory. It was a battle for people's hearts and minds, in which music was a potent weapon. In this programme Ivan Hewett reveals how the two superpowers successfully co-opted music into the ideological struggle, through interviews with leading musicians including the pianist, Vladimir Ashkenazy, defectors, State Department officials, and Oleg Gordievsky, a KGB agent who later spied for the British. But music proved to be an ambiguous weapon. In the 70s and 80s, music slipped out of the superpowers' grasp, and affected the outcome of the Cold War in ways no-one could have foreseen. *** Strange Weather Days 1.5 - Windy City - Helen Young talks to witnesses and experts about the tornado in London's Gunnersbury, 1954 Strange Weather Days 2.5 - Helen Young talks to eyewitnesses about the Aurora Borealis - rare and dramatic lights seen in the sky in Edinburgh. Strange Weather Days 3.5 - In 1953 the worst floods of this century hit East Anglia. The community remembers the night and the lives lost. Strange Weather Days 4.5 - Meteorologist Helen Young visits the bizarre frost hollow of Rickmansworth near the Chilterns. Strange Weather Days 5.5 - Meteorologist Helen Young recalls 1975, when snow fell in June at Buxton cricket ground. *** Theatre of the Absurd - Martin Esslin, who died in London at the age of 83, was a critic and translator as well as a radio producer.In a succession of books, Mr Esslin introduced a wider public to the works of modern European writers. He began in 1959 with a study of the German poet, playwright and Communist intellectual, Bertolt Brecht. And, in 1961 in The Theatre of the Absurd, he coined the term used ever since to describe the work of playwrights like Eugene Ionesco, Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter. In the book's celebrated opening, Mr Esslin described the reaction of prisoners at San Quentin jail to a production of Beckett's Waiting for Godot. Traditional theatre-goers had been mystified by this revolutionary and avant-garde work. They found its meaning opaque, puzzled over its mixture of musical hall routines and philosophical dialogue, and rebelled at passages of (literal) nonsense. Yet the prisoners found it uproariously funny. Mr Esslin set out to show that these apparently obscure works were actually a great deal more accessible - not to say entertaining and provocative - than many of their earliest audiences thought. *** Who Put the Cat in the Hat - Michael Rosen celebrates the life and work of Theodor Seuss Geisel - Dr. Seuss. *** Withnail and I - The Reunion - Sue MacGregor presents the series which reunites a group of people intimately involved in a moment of modern history. In a special edition of the programme, recorded in front of an audience at the BFI Southbank, she gathers together the cast and director of the 1987 cult movie Withnail and I. Joining her onstage are Richard E Grant, Paul McGann, Ralph Brown and writer/director Bruce Robinson. There is also an extended interview with Richard Griffiths. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Total 0 folder(s); 105 file(s) Total files size: 564 MB; 563909 KB; 577443172 Bytes ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^